Friday, December 15, 2017

Concepts for Capitalizing on the Unique Identity of Our Communities

Townsend Corridor Revitalization

Proposed Townsend Corridor Land Use Plan
Proposed Townsend Corridor Land Use Plan
University of Tennessee landscape architecture students conceived a vision of Townsend that includes preservation of agricultural and open space lands; clustering of new development; and a new greenway along the Little River to promote activity and access to the water.
Proposed Townsend Corridor Districts
Proposed Townsend Corridor Districts
The students proposed districts that group like uses together so that Townsend residents and visitors can stop and walk to multiple destinations instead of having to drive from place to place along the corridor. The Welcome and Arts districts at either end would offer wayfinding for visitors to encourage them to stop and see what Townsend has to offer.
The Little River Linear Park
The Little River Linear Park
The students proposed a linear park and greenway along the Little River through Townsend. This is a long-term vision, as most of the land along the river is privately owned. One of the goals of the park would be to diversify access to the river. Use of the river today is dominated by tubers, which is controversial among Townsend residents.
Microbrewery Concept
Microbrewery Concept
Architecture student Alexis Porten proposed a microbrewery for the east end of Townsend, across Lamar Alexander Parkway from the Great Smoky Mountains Heritage Center. Agricultural land within Townsend would produce the wheat, barley and apples that are transformed into beer and cider. The proposed brewery building (below) sits at the edge of the Little River and houses a tasting room. An apple shed, honey house and two silos would share the brewery site.
Townsend Town Center
Townsend Town Center
This vision for the Town Center includes a mix of shops and homes, as well as some new amenities, including a town green, theater and recreation complex.
 
Pause
PROJECT NAME:

Townsend Corridor Revitalization

DEMONSTRATION PROJECT PARTNER:

University of Tennessee, Knoxville,
College of Architecture and Design
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

About this Project

Townsend is a small community known to many as “the peaceful side of the Smokies.” As a town largely dependent on tourism for its economic vitality, Townsend sometimes finds that things are a little too peaceful. With this demonstration project, students and faculty from the University of Tennessee worked with a group of Townsend’s leaders and residents to imagine changes that would extend the tourism season and expand opportunities for locals while still retaining Townsend’s small-town, foothills charm.

Available Resources

Download the poster:

Concepts for Capitalizing on the Unique Identity of Our Communities: Townsend Corridor Revitalization

Background

University of Tennessee landscape architecture students conceived a vision of Townsend that includes preservation of agricultural and open space lands; clustering of new development; and a new greenway along the Little River to promote activity and access to the water. The students proposed districts that group like uses together so that Townsend residents and visitors can stop and walk to multiple destinations instead of having to drive from place to place along the corridor. The Welcome and Arts districts at either end would offer wayfinding for visitors to encourage them to stop and see what Townsend has to offer.

Concept

Improving Pedestrian Safety
Civil engineering students in their senior capstone class studied the U.S. 321 corridor from several perspectives. The transportation students were asked to develop ideas that would improve safety for pedestrians and bicyclists while maintaining safe and efficient travel for drivers. One team recommended converting the five-lane highway to a two-lane facility with bicycle lanes, a median, turn lanes and attractive crosswalks for pedestrians.

Another team of transportation engineering students recommended a wide planted median with crosswalks at regular intervals. The skew in the crossing means pedestrians are angled toward oncoming traffic for better visibility between drivers and pedestrians.

Level of Service (LOS) is a measure of the capacity of street segments and intersections. The students found that even with the reduction in the number of motor vehicle lanes, the LOS for drivers on U.S. 321 in Townsend remained high. The reduced driver speeds and more frequent crossings increased the LOS for pedestrians. The LOS for bicyclists remained poor, but the greenway through Townsend gives them an alternative to the on-street bike lanes. 

About   |   Participate   |   Learn   |   Watch   |   Grow Stronger   |   Newsroom
Copyright 2013 by Knoxville-Knox County Metropolitan Planning Commission